A short trip is enough to renew ourselves and the world. -Marcel Proust

 

                        Our foundation came about due to a trip to the Orinoco Delta in Venezuela.  There Fernando Lambos, a dedicated Pemon Indian, showed me the world of an endangered culture.  He was from the neighboring country of Guyana.  Continuing conflicts between the government and the indigenous peoples during the 1960s had lead his family to emigrate to Venezuela. For his protection, Reginold's name was changed to Fernando, taking a piece of his background and identity.  This foundation is named after him in an effort to bring strength and attention to his projects in South America.


Anna Selzer

The beginning of my commitment to Africa comes in 2014 with my first visit to the continent.  I'm not there to experience impoverished countries.  I've come with a sense of curiosity for a culture pulsing with drumbeats and brightened by song, a place where big cats dose under Acacia trees and meerkats watch over the houses.  My image of the continent is vivid and wild, and after my trip I'm still convinced that the sun nourishes the growth of a goodhearted soul.            

 During my stay in Zomba, I get to know a small community located in the middle of juicy green papayas and tea plantations.  I spend my time with Ernest and Victor, both of whom speak some English.  I learn how to chew sugar cane, cook Nsima, set up all five variations of the national board game, and gauge prices at the local market.  I also learn how much school costs, where the children play during the day, how families function and many other small details.  Surprisingly, I'm not the only one with a thirst for knowledge of another culture.  Ernest and Victor want to hear about Germany, see pictures and learn songs.  They ask me to show the children new games, to count and speak with them.  Unofficial and indirect, this is the beginning of my support.  I give the teachers new ideas to improve mathematics teaching and to use new resources. I do not need anything but a little creativity.

Now I'm a certified Field, Trails and Marines Guide in South Africa.  I discovered my love of the wilderness after several weeks in Malawi.  In just a few weeks, I came to love the people and the culture.  It's important to me to strengthen the global exchange of knowledge and provide people in remote parts of the world with access to essential resources. In the coming years, my projects will mainly focus on the supply of energy for the region.  Due to the deforestation of Malawi's woodlands, recent years have seen a growing lack of firewood.  Alternative sources of energy must be found, and I would like to help. 

 

 

Kathrin Selzer

My name is Kathrin Selzer.  I work as an engineer and am very interested in environmental protection and the use and development of alternative energy sources.  In May of 2012 I had the opportunity to get to know—and fall in love with—South America, specifically Venezuela.  The virgin forests especially impressed me, huge centuries-old trees with massive trunks holding up a gigantic canopy of leaves.  Getting the opportunity to hike through undisturbed nature, visit remote Indian tribes, and get to know the animals of the Orinoko Delta was a life-changing experience for me.  An especially magical memory is that of being allowed to witness a sea turtle laying her 80 eggs on a deserted beach at midnight, before she disappeared back into the deep sea.

When Fernando, our guide, told me of his dream to start his own travel company, I enthusiastically offered him my help.  Having successfully started my own business, I could give him both advice and practical support. Then we had the idea to take part of the proceeds from his tours and invest them in a project committed to protecting the environment and helping indigenous people.  The concept of a new foundation was born.  In 2014, my daughter Anna and I founded the non-profit Reginald Brooks Foundation for Environmental Protection.  Our goal—not only in South America, but worldwide—is to get money from the donations of tourists to the places in the world where it's most needed, to help people and habitats in need.